Saint of the Day

St Hedwig, Widow

St Hedwig was illustrious for her royal birth, being the maternal aunt of St Elisabeth, daughter of the King of Hungary. At the age of twelve she was given in marriage to Henry, duke of Poland, and brought up the children of their marriage in the fear of God. In order to devote herself more closely to the service of God, she persuaded her husband to agree to a vow of continence for both of them. Upon the death of her husband she took the Cistercian

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St Theresa of Avilla, Virgin

St Theresa was born of devout and noble parents at Avilla in Spain. While still a child, burning with the desire of martyrdom, she run away from home, and tried to go to Africa, but was brought back. After the death of her mother, she commended herself completely to the protection of the Blessed Virgin. When she was twenty, she professed the rule of the nuns of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. Eager for the salvation of souls, she restored the observance

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St Callistus I, Pope and Martyr
St Callistus I

Most of what we know of Callistus comes from attacks by his contemporaries, notably Tertullian and the antipope Hippolytus. As a young slave Callistus was put in charge of a bank by his master Carpophorus, in which the brethren and widows lodged money. Callistus lost it all, and fled. When his master caught up with his ship Callistus jumped overboard to escape capture but was saved from drowning. He was given the punishment reserved for slaves, that

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St Edward the Confessor

He became King of England in 1042. He was regarded as a saint during his lifetime, renowned for his generosity to the Church and to the poor and for his readiness to listen to his subjects’ grievances. He died on 5 January 1066, the last of the old Anglo-Saxon line, and his death precipitated the dynastic quarrels that led to the conquest of England by William of Normandy later the same year. On 13 October 1163 his relics were translated to a new

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St Wilfrid, Bishop Confessor
St Wilfred

Wilfrid was born in Northumbria in 634. As a boy he was educated in the monastery of Lindisfarne. Later he travelled to Rome in the company of Benet Biscop, spending a considerable time at Lyons on the way. This wider, continental experience had a profound effect upon the young man and, on his return, he showed himself to have become a keen supporter of the traditions of the Roman Church as against the prevailing ‘Celtic’ customs introduced by

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